Tooth Crown Procedure


How are Tooth Crowns Attached to your Tooth?

Your cosmetic dentist will make an impression of the tooth and a dental laboratory will create the crown. You will typically leave the office with a temporary crown to wear while the permanent crown is being made - this takes about two weeks. The permanent crown is then cemented onto your tooth. Typically, only two visits are required for this part of the procedure. Often, a preliminary restoration of your tooth may be needed before a crown can be placed. To stabilize your tooth, a filling must first be put in place prior to placing a crown due to the loss of original tooth structure. Tooth crowns usually last ten to fifteen years.

Be sure to discuss with your cosmetic dentist that the cement color used for your permanent crown will be the same as used for your temporary crown. A try in paste is used for this purpose. The color of the cement does affect the overall color of a porcelain crown, so this needs to be discussed long before your temporary crown is placed.

In some cases your cosmetic dentist may choose to use a Flipper instead of a temporary crown. A Flipper is a false tooth to temporarily take the place of a missing tooth before the permanent crown is placed. A Flipper can be attached via either a wire or a plastic piece that fits in the roof of your mouth. Flippers are meant to be a temporary solution while awaiting the permanent crown.

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Next: Different types of dental crowns

  1. Introduction to dental crowns section
  2. Dental crowns - an overview
  3. Who is a candidate for having teeth crowned?
  4. Tooth crowns - Procedure description
  5. Varieties of tooth crowns
  6. How much do dental crowns cost?
  7. Pros and cons of tooth crowns
  8. Dental crowns - Before and after photos
  9. Personal stories from people who have had tooth crowns
  10. Choosing a color for tooth crowns
  11. Discuss crowns with others

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 A guide to dental crowns and caps.