Types of Dentures


Complete Dentures

These replace all of your teeth, upper or lower. Their comfort depends on muscle, bones, tongue, and saliva. Patients begin wearing conventional dentures after healing the teeth that were pulled.

Immediate Dentures

Immediate Dentures are placed all at once, and may require additional adjustments after the healing process. It can take months for your bone and tissue to stabilize after tooth extractions.

Upper Dentures

Upper Dentures, tend to be a bit easier to adjust to. These are made of the same materials as a Complete Denture, but are designed to provide you with upper teeth only.

Over Dentures

Over Dentures are a type of conventional denture similar to Complete Dentures. The difference is that not all teeth are extracted and they use one or more natural teeth for their support. This type provides greater stabilization during chewing. Over Dentures cost more and typically require more preparation dental appointments until the procedure is fully complete.

Partial Dentures

Designed to correct the gaps in your smile when only some of your teeth are missing. Metal attachments anchor the dentures to your natural teeth. Partial Dentures maintain tooth alignment by preventing your remaining teeth from shifting. Partial Dentures can also help prevent your loss of more teeth due to decay or gum disease.

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  1. Introduction to denture section
  2. Dentures - an overview
  3. When are dentures a possible solution?
  4. Procedure description: Dentures
  5. Dentures & false teeth - different types
  6. How much do dentures cost?
  7. Things to consider - Pros and cons of getting dentures
  8. Before and after photos - dentures
  9. Personal stories from people who have dentures
  10. Discuss dentures on the cosmetic dentistry message board

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 A guide to dentures for missing teeth.